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This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

Being known as the least nasty character on Veep, while not exactly a compliment, speaks to the unflappable, idiotic enthusiasm of Richard T. Splett, and similar qualities in Sam Richardson, who was supposed to play him for one episode and wound up a permanent cast member. Before that starts sounding like an insult, Richardson himself once told The A.V. Club that being an idiot “is my bread and butter. I am that person, and I wish people didn’t know.” Well, they know now, even if they’re not likely to agree. The Detroit Free Press called him one of the show’s comic high points, and GQ went further. “Even among competitively funny company, it’s usually the best bet to keep your eye on Richardson.”

As Splett – and comedy props to whoever came up with the last name – he is confidently incompetent and does not question the power he has in no way earned. You can’t blame him, then, for being more nonplussed than flattered when real White House staffers compliment him on the accuracy of his portrayal. And any self-deprecating comments about his own IQ aside, Richardson has one thing figured out: Nothing’s funnier than someone who’s unaware of his own blind spots.

As a kid, he made regular trips from his hometown of Detroit to visit family in Ghana. These trips, and the lack of any siblings close in age, gave him plenty of time alone to watch the everyday cast of characters around him. As a result, he’d compiled a vast grab bag of impressions before he’d even hit high school. That’s when a small disaster struck. It wasn’t until after he’d been admitted to University of Detroit Jesuit High that he realized it was an all-boys school. When a busload of girls rolled up one day to audition for a school play, one more hormonal boy discovered his love for the theater.

While still a teenager, he took comedy and improv classes with a Second City Detroit troupe. He graduated and enrolled in Wayne State University to study theater, but soon dropped out to perform full time with Second City sketch theater groups in Detroit and Chicago, where his range of characters became his comedy calling card. He set out for L.A. in 2012 and made appearances in several movies as well as episodes of The Office and Arrested Development. The move led to steady work on Veep, Detroit stills looms large in his heart; his deep, blind love for his hometown inspired his new Comedy Central show Detroiters, on which he and co-star/co-writer Tim Robinson play two local ad men whose work is not the stuff of Superbowl halftimes.

As Richardson describes it, it’s “Mad Men’s Sterling Cooper, if it was run by two idiots.” Their agency has gone “from ads for Pan Am to ads for a local wig shop.” If you question the comic potential of the premise, recall for a moment the exuberant, unsophisticated and unintentionally hilarious used car, appliance and carpet pitchmen of your own late-night TV youth. And who better than a genius at embodying those very qualities to bring them to life?

Detroiters (which has been shooting locally) is also a love letter to a city whose people and reputation seem ripe for a more balanced portrayal than what they’ve received in the news media. The bonus gift Richardson is giving us non-Detroiters is embedded in the show: Braying, antic yet somehow poignant thirty-second spots that we suspect have a stand-alone future on YouTube. As far as Richardson’s future is concerned, the safest prediction has already been made: But wait…there’s more!!

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

The literary critic Harold Bloom observed, “Without Shakespeare, we would not have seen ourselves as what we are.” Kenneth Lonergan also wields the mirror, minus the cinematic frills that embellish and distract from most of what passes for “character” films these days. He’d likely scoff at Bardly comparisons, but at the very least, both dramatists serve the hypothesis that as humans, we’re endlessly fascinating to ourselves. If the acclaim surrounding Lonergan’s work could be distilled to a few common points, one would surely be that he possesses one of the most acute, truth-detecting radars of any modern play or screenwriter. Tim Sanford, who’s produced some of Lonergan’s plays, said, “His understanding of character is so rich, he finds the essence of what makes people click.”

If there’s any complaint to be lodged about his projects, it may be the lag time between them, which can be long enough to render newer fans unfamiliar with some of his finest work. We trust the current buzz surrounding Manchester By the Sea, which he wrote and directed, will prompt some much-deserved rediscovery. If notoriously and self-admittedly cranky, slow, recalcitrant and prone to “always sitting home in a depression,” he is also painstaking in his adherence to the authenticity of every phrase, of every shot and cut. The small, ordinary moments that comprise his work are what hit home the hardest, only they don’t hit as much as sink in, absorbed through our porous shared experience.

Lonergan’s mom and stepdad were both psychoanalysts whose clients were (anonymously) subjects of dinner table discussion, inspiring his fascination with real people and their individual experience of the world (it also inspired the idea for Analyze This, a film he wrote solely to make money and has never seen.) He began writing plays in the ninth grade, and his play The Rennings Children, written when he was 18, was produced by the Young Playwrights Festival in 1982. His real theater breakout came 14 years later with This Is Our Youth, which was nominated for the Drama Desk Award for Best Play and continues to be regularly staged. Four years later, The Waverly Gallery was nominated for a Pulitzer, and he followed with Lobby Hero, another Drama Desk contender. In his review of that play, Spectator’s Toby Hill wrote, “…within about five minutes, any sense you have of being a member of the audience…has vanished. You’re totally absorbed in what’s going on. Lonergan is particularly good at showing how good intentions can be undermined by unconscious desires. Few of his characters are capable of resisting their own malignant impulses.”

All along, Lonergan was also screenwriting, sometimes for his own artistic fulfillment, sometimes for hire. In 2000, You Can Count on Me brought him to the wide and sudden attention of the film business. The plot was simple – a young man (Mark Ruffalo) in financial straits moves in with his sister (Laura Linney) in their small hometown – but the characters and story sang. The New York Times wrote, “There was such intense realness about it, the way people really talk, the way lives are actually lived, that was unlike anything else on screen, radical almost, in its attention to the genuine messiness of human lives.” It was eleven more years before he wrote and directed his next film, the beautiful and devastating Margaret. It crushed Lonergan in the process. Release was delayed for years over a ruinous legal battle with the studio over (mainly) the length of film. He agonized over the artistic compromises he was forced to make and disavowed the version released by the studio, which basically dumped it. As a result, most people missed a film The New Yorker said would be “…remembered, years and decades hence, as one of the year’s, even the decade’s, cinematic wonders.”

The blow was lasting, prompting friends like Matt Damon to step in. To cheer him up, Damon commissioned the script for Manchester By the Sea, and five years after Margaret, we’re looking at another masterpiece. Like most of his work, it gives voice to mundane people leading mundane lives, but without condescension – or resolution. Singular events and problems may be settled, but questions of his characters’ destinies go largely unanswered. How can they be? Like ours, they’ll continue to unfold slowly and haphazardly. If you believe life should be tidy, you believe we have the ability to control it. Nice idea, shaky premise.

Amazon snatched up rights to Manchester for $10 million, and with more platforms becoming studios, no doubt Lonergan’s subtle, resounding voice will reach the wider audience it merits. If it’s a bit slow in happening, that’s okay. We’ll wait.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

David Oyelowo has a favorite phrase from St. Francis of Assisi. “Preach the gospel, and every now and again use words.” You could see why. One of the most remarkably talented film and stage actors working today, he employs words to stunning effect, but it’s between syllables that one sees his real power. There’s something in his being that telegraphs a certain dignity, a deep human awareness and an underlying joy that he seems incapable of turning off, on screen or in person. “He’s kind of an amazing balance of import and also a kind of levity and light,” said J. J. Abrams, producer of Oyelowo’s upcoming film The God Particle.

He’s best known for his acclaimed portrayal of Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma, in which his embodiment of a man raised to sainthood status as one also troubled by fear and doubt was praised most widely for its authenticity. That lack of hagiography may be partly due to an outsider’s perspective. Race played a significant, but different role in his life. He was born in London to Nigerian parents who moved the family to Lagos when he was six, and back when he was 14. Comparatively privileged in Nigeria where classmates called him coconut (white inside) and in more humble circumstances in the UK, he never completely fit. He took nothing for granted other than his own self-worth, and the importance of bettering himself.

Despite being a hard worker and ambitious, he admits to enrolling in a youth theater program only because a girl he liked invited him. Oyelowo didn’t share his decision to pursue acting with his father (who was thinking along more lawyerly lines) until he’d secured a scholarship to London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He was offered a season with the Royal Shakespeare Company, and in a major landmark for color-blind casting, became the first black actor to play an English king in a major production of Shakespeare. He was soon getting parts in a number of British films and TV series, most famously, officer Danny Hunter in the British TV drama series Spooks (MI-5 to North American audiences).

Problem was, given British producers’ fondness for period pieces, he found the choice of interesting roles for black actors if not insulting, at least limiting. When he looked at the careers of his acting heroes – Will Smith, Sidney Poitier and Denzel Washington – he realized they were made in Hollywood. So that’s where he went. Catching the eye of major directors like Ava DuVernay and Lee Daniels opened opportunities for more nuanced characters, and recognition. His work in The Butler, Red Tails, Intersteller, and Disney’s Queen of Katwe garnered a wider audience, but his 83-minute masterwork may just be HBO’s Nightingale. Writing about the 2014 film, which essentially starred Oyelowo and a room, The New York Times called his performance nothing less than amazing. “Mr. Oyelowo gives a riveting, disorienting and suspenseful tour of an unraveling mind. The music and cinematography are artful, but the props are mundane: a coffee maker, a mirror, a laptop. Everything is in Mr. Oyelowo’s voice, face and body.”

He found time for an all-too-brief return to the stage last year in an “electrifying” Othello opposite Daniel Craig, something we’ll be kicking ourselves for a long time for missing. “Mr. Oyelowo is Olympian in his anguish,” read the review in the Times’ Critics’ Picks. “His Othello is the real thing — a bona fide tragic hero, whose capacity for emotion is way beyond our everyday depths.”

Early on in his career, Oyelowo told his agent to put him up only for non-race-specific parts, an edict he worried was naïve when offers were initially slow in coming. But holding steadfast has given him a chance to prove his range. And while he remains adamant about not playing one type of character, he is interested in a recurring character trait. He believes virtue is “something to be celebrated — entertaining, compelling, dramatic.” It’s not something you hear from many actors, and maybe that’s for the best. In the hands of an artist of lesser skill and subtlety, the intent might be noble, but the result one-note or worse, pandering and corny. In Oyelowo’s work, we’re able to look past even the most cynical parts of ourselves, and see something to hope for. In him, we have actor we not only can’t look away from, but simply don’t want to.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

In 1990 Elijah Wood sat down with Entertainment Tonight to discuss his career. He seemed a little directionless for a moment, wavering between “doing something with sharks” and acting, but towards the end, convinced himself that acting was the way to go. “Doing scenes is fun. You can be anyone you want. I’ve got a good career doing this.” If that seemed cocky for a nine-year-old, it’s hard to resist a kid who’s cuter and more elfin than a…well, you know. And even brief history proved to be on his side. A talent agent who’d spotted a 7-year-old Wood suggested an acting career, and one week later his folks had sold their Cedar Rapids, Iowa deli and were on the road to L.A. He made his debut in Back to the Future II at nine and had four major films in the can by the time he turned 12. In her review of North for The New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote, “Mr. Wood is currently the most natural, confident child actor of his generation.” Of his work in The War, Roger Ebert stated that Wood had “emerged as the most talented actor, in his age group, in Hollywood history.”

Cue the child actor implosion, right? Hardly. Cue Peter Jackson, and enter The Hobbit. At 18, Wood signed on for what became one of the most life-consuming, awards-sweeping cultural phenomenons in recent cinematic memory. The Lord of The Rings trilogy was filmed and released with mind-boggling speed for films of such scope and detail: The Fellowship of the Ring was released in 2001, The Two Towers in 2002 and The Return of the King in 2003, Wood starring in each as the intrepid Frodo Baggins. He loved the experience, but the danger of leading a monster franchise is, of course, that it can leave an actor with a dilemma in the face of his next career move. Even if you’re looking to replicate the same brand of success, how many non-ridiculous roles for four-foot-tall, pointy-eared, Middle Earth-dwelling types are there?

But a post-success existential crisis was probably never in the cards for Wood, who credits his mom as a steadying influence who stressed family and friends over Hollywood. It also just doesn’t seem to be in his nature. LOTR has allowed Wood to make choices based on personal artistic interests versus box office domination, and that’s when he became even more interesting as an actor. “It’s time we stop only thinking about Elijah Wood for his work with Peter Jackson,” declared Decider last year. “He has become the surprisingly complicated force to be reckoned with.”

His first post-trilogy role was in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. He next played the serial killer in Robert Rodriguez’s Sin City. More such films followed, each different from its predecessor, each pegging him as one of the most unpeggable actors around. Not surprising, then, that his first starring TV role was a suicidal, wide-eyed straight man to a crude, non-existent dog. Wilfred was a cult-favorite remake of the Australian original – a bummer-from-down-under take on Harvey. He’s part of another unapologetically odd, and equally watchable duo in his current series, BBC America’s Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. But wait, there’s more (as there always is with curious types whose interests pile up like books on a never-empty nightstand). The long-time music fanatic became a skilled professional DJ and started his own label, Simian Records, signing a number of indie acts.

He’s also been able to indulge his love for the horror genre, acting in gems like Grand Piano, in which he plays a musician terrorized in the course of making a professional comeback. IndieWire wrote, “As the man behind the keys, Wood carries the film, finding a believable and compelling arc for a character whose default setting might in lesser hands be desperation.” Next up is I Don’t Feel At Home in This World Anymore, which debuted at Sundance and is already generating buzz.

He’s aiding and abetting original filmmaking from the other side of the camera as well. He co-founded SpectreVision to help young, promising directors with unique voices make films “that wouldn’t necessarily get made if it weren’t for us maniacs.” If their smart, hilariously gory The Greasy Strangler is any indication, mission accomplished. Wood believes Hollywood greed produces bad movies, and that audiences are slowly losing interest in big-budget action flicks in favor of more intelligent – or at least interesting – fare. As a producer whose first question to potential filmmakers is, “Do you have a personal passion project that no one will support because it’s too outside the box?” he’s obviously a guy we need in the game.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

For the uninitiated, or just those curious about things that seem insane: Motocross could be defined simply as a bunch of guys going around and around a track. Watch a race, and you’ll see it’s more like a ballet. Only the dancer is moving at speeds of up to 60 mph across a dirt stage of turns, obstacles and jumps that can shoot him 70 feet forward and send him soaring as high as a three-story building. All while (hopefully) astride a 220-lb bike. Adding to the fun, he’s dancing with a corps of at least 20 other guys trying to do the same thing – only faster – to a soundtrack that vibrates like a chorus of very angry bears. Okay, never mind; that doesn’t sound much like dance after all. Nor does it sound any less insane, which why it requires just the opposite: complete cool, control and focus.

And dedication. Ricky Carmichael got his first minibike as a Valentine’s Day gift. He was five. His scored his first win at six in Daytona, Fla., and by 13, he was arguably the fastest minibike rider in world. But if bigger bikes exist, they must be ridden, and Carmichael rode – first 125ccs, then 250s and eventually 450s – with tunnel vision on the scoreboard. He won several main events in his rookie year with the Splitfire Pro Circuit Kawasaki team at age 18, and came back to finish the job by winning all eight main events of the Supercross 1998 125cc East Region. [Supercross is motocross, but takes place in stadiums.] In 2000, he jumped to the 250 class and won the 250 National Motocross Championship on his first try. The next year, he won 13 out of 15 Supercross races as well as the championship. In 2002, Carmichael accomplished something previously thought impossible: He won all 24 motos of the 2002 National season. In 2003, he won both Supercross and National titles again. And in 2004 he again won all 24 National motos, proving his 2002 feat was not a supernatural once-in-a-lifetime event. In 2005, he also won all 12 events in the 250cc Outdoor National Championship, winning 22 of 24 motos on a 450. Carmichael also scored the U.S. Open of Supercross title and led Team USA to victory at the Motocross des Nations. Along the way, he battled back from several injuries sustained in crashes as spectacular as his wins. (Search “Ricky Carmichael worst crashes” and prepare to cringe.)

He announced that 2006 would be his last full-time season and then got down to business, dominating the Outdoor National Championship season. In 2007 he raced only select events but still finished with three Supercross wins and six Outdoor National Championship wins, taking every race he entered, remaining arguably the fastest rider on the track, and inarguably, with his record 150 combined SX/MX career victories, the winningest racer in the sport – The Greatest Of All Time.

In his 2007 semi-retirement, he took up another long-held ambition: the sedate pursuit of NASCAR racing, which still involves going around and around a track, this time at about 200 mph. In 2015, he was inducted in the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America.

Roger DeCoster, the Suzuki team manager responsible for recruiting Carmichael in 2005, said, “He is the most dedicated guy I have ever worked with. He wants to win as much on Mondays as he does on race day. He raises the game of the people around him. He gives his all.” Sounds about right for a guy who told Transworld Motocross at the start of his career, “I won’t accept seconds and thirds.” Coming up, he also paid attention to the off-track commonalities he noted among his racing idols: good sportsmanship and humility. The hype that surrounded Carmichael throughout his career went largely in one ear and out the other, and to this day he’s consistently gracious in discussing his fiercest rivals. Dirt Rider called him “the best bargain in motocross,” opining that top MX sponsors couldn’t pay enough for the PR value he brought to their brands.

These days, he co-owns professional Supercross/Motocross team RCH Racing. Carmichael leads the team’s rider development, testing, and research programs. He’s also helping advance the next generation of riders by hosting a hands-on riding school with instructors who collectively boast over 20 AMA national titles. He lends his name to the Ricky Carmichael Daytona Amateur Supercross, one of five annual major amateur championship events across the country. And, he’s taking what he’s learned on the bigger, better-funded NASCAR circuit to help grow audience and sponsorship for MX/SX, which counts 80 percent of its fans among the coveted 18-35 age bracket. Seems Carmichael’s just destined to keep going around in circles, moving the sport forward the whole time.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

When you’re born a month premature in your parents’ small-town Idaho bathroom, there’s no place to go but up, right? So instead of college, why not take your ’82 Corolla, $6,000, and your mom, and head out to L.A. to be an actor? Under those circumstances, a kooky contestant spot on The Price is Right and a string of commercials (Corn Pops, Juicy Fruit, Vanilla Coke) are legitimately “up.”

The wacked-out, frenetic gusto with which the young Aaron Paul pitched those products could be presumed the result of consuming admirable quantities of them. Get to know him, though, and you realize the intensity is that of a guy who’s all-in, all the time. A guy who embraces each new opportunity with the zeal that comes from not knowing if “now” will ever happen again. When you spend seven years doing one-episode guest TV appearances before landing on – and surviving – one of the most critically acclaimed TV shows of all time, you can’t be blamed for thinking that way.

As Breaking Bad’s chemistry student/meth addict/drug dealer Jesse Pinkman, Paul was supposed to be killed off after the show’s first season. Instead, he became the only character besides lead Bryan Cranston to appear in every episode of the show, which went on to win 16 Emmy Awards and two Golden Globe Awards (among many, many others). It won Paul himself the Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series three times. While Breaking Bad may have killed its own with reckless abandon, creator Vince Gilligan showed shrewd discrimination in keeping Paul above ground, telling Details magazine, “Over the years, Jesse became more likable than I originally intended, because Aaron himself is so easy to relate to. He deepened my understanding of the character, and that deepened the meaning of the show.” If viewers related to Jesse, it was because Paul lent him poignancy and a moral compass, even if its needle was inclined to wobble.

Paul’s bantam cockiness as Tobey Marshall in 2014’s Need for Speed exemplifies his gift for letting us sense versus see what goes on beneath his characters’ cultivated personae. There’s no doubting his talent, but that’s an amorphous word. Paul’s best work draws on instinct, and a deep curiosity about people, morality and human contradictions; characters and their stories are one way for him to explore the answers. The fact that he’s the son of a Baptist minister made us especially curious about his experience starring in Hulu’s original series The Path, where he portrays a cult member struggling with questions of faith, power and marriage.

It’s a good career moment for an inveterate seeker like Paul, who loves what he’s doing but loves whatever he may do next even more. Last year alone, he got back in the blood-and-guts biz in the highbrow heist flick Triple 9 with Kate Winslet and Chiwetel Ejiofor and turned in strong, sympathetic performances in both Eye In The Sky and Come and Find Me. He’s been starring in and executive-producing Netflix’s dark comedy BoJack Horseman, and recently sold a one-hour drama to NBC.

And why not? If Paul still sees Breaking Bad as a unicorn, then no better time to be all-in. In a New York Times article, Bryan Cranston recalled an especially punishing location shoot that left the Breaking cast exhausted. “We’re wiping our brows and [Aaron] just said to me, ‘Aw, man, that was so much fun.’ I said, ‘Aaron, that’s my wish for you. I hope you never lose that enthusiasm.’ ” We’re not worried.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

Crazy? Depressed? Obsessed? Then hey gang – let’s put on a show! A show about an unhappy lawyer who upends a cushy Manhattan life in a delusional move to West Covina (where?) to revive a decade-old romance! Oh yeah, and let’s make it a splashy musical! What’s not to love, right? Since being pitched to (and rejected by) most networks, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has been hailed for its ambitious production, oddly charmingly characters and insightful, if uncomfortable look at modern life and love, all set to giddy song and dance numbers. The New York Times called its Golden Globe-winning star, co-creator and writer Rachel Bloom “the kind of unspoiled voice the industry should be cultivating.” The Times did its part, naming Crazy Ex-Girlfriend among best TV shows of 2016.

Crack open the That Explains A Lot file, and you’ll learn Bloom was exposed to musical theater from a young age by a piano-playing mom and a grandfather who was an amateur director and standup comic. “The first song I learned was “All I Do Is Dream of You” from Singin’ in the Rain, and soon after that I started to get up and sing at family functions.” Until she was 18, her musical diet consisted solely of show tunes.

The passion that led her to perform “Adelaide’s Lament” from Guys and Dolls in a seventh-grade lip-syncing contest, along with a penchant for sweat pants and self-administered haircuts did not grease the path to popularity. In fact, she recalls ages 11-13 as being some of the most miserable of her life. Ah, the joys of being a theater geek. But that experience sparked something that down the road led her to turn the genre she loved on its ear. Bloom noticed the pop culture embraced by her peers glorified teen-hood as something glamorous and mysterious, versus the awkward, messy horror show it so often is. She gamely pursued singing and dancing lessons and at first, a musical theater degree at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Once there, she discovered sketch comedy, joining the school’s Hammerkatz troupe. Sketch writing was a revelation, teaching her discipline and certain rules of comedy. She performed with Upright Citizens Brigade to hone her skills, along with her point of view.

“I fucking hate the word ‘cute’ when it comes to comedy, especially in musical theater, because ‘cute’ usually means predictable and not laugh-out-loud funny or soft,” she told the Dallas Observer in 2014. She believes if you’re not being honest and vulgar (two qualities she thinks can’t be separated), then there’s no point. For Bloom, the magic isn’t in the genre’s glamorous illusions, but in ripping them off like a waxing strip (just Google “The Sexy Getting Ready Song”). But Bloom was “going there” in her own music comedy videos long before going there on the show, using pop culture to skewer itself. She began posting numbers like “You Can Touch My Boobies,” “I Steal Pets,” and “If Disney Cartoons Were Historically Accurate” online. But it was her Britney-esque “F*** Me, Ray Bradbury,” a raunchily heartfelt tribute to her favorite science fiction writer, that changed everything. It garnered three million YouTube views, and got her a job writing for FOX’s Allen Gregory and eventually, brought her to the notice of The Devil Wears Prada screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna, who approached her about co-creating Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

The show was created for Showtime, but sold to The CW, which required commendably few cleanups for network TV. But Bloom believes being offensive for the sake of being offensive is lazy and narrow minded. The show largely uses its more outrageous bits to unmask feelings people really have, and deftly employs pop tropes and glitzy music sequences to reflect the heightened emotions we assign to those feelings in our own heads. In the process, it’s also managed to cultivate one of TV’s most diverse and talented casts and bring new generations to a genre they might otherwise reject.

Is Bloom a Sally Bowles for Gen Y? Who knows? But Crazy-Ex has no doubt given her momentum, and it’s exciting to ponder where her smart, fearless, nut-job sensibility might take her. So kids, don’t fly your freak flag at half-mast or hide your jazz hands behind your back. They may get you laughed at for a while, but as Bloom herself found, “I remained myself and the world got cooler around me.”

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

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In “No Method to Her Madness,” a review of the Noah Baumbach film Greenberg that could’ve also been titled “Ode to Greta Gerwig,” A.O. Scott wrote that the actress, “most likely without intending to be anything of the kind, may well be the definitive screen actress of her generation.” He goes on (at length) to praise her performance: “She comes across as pretty, smart, hesitant, insecure, confused, determined – all at once or in no particular order. Which is to say that she is bracingly, winningly and sometimes gratingly real.” He’s still talking about Greenberg, but the same could be said of her work in films like Frances Ha, Mistress America and Maggie’s Plan.

Ben Brantley, Scott’s colleague over in the theater department, seemed equally smitten with her stage debut as Becky in The Village Bike: “She registers as guileless because we can detect every confused emotion that crosses her face… She reads as so transparent that her feelings come to seem like our own. There’s no barrier of glossy, movie star charm between her and us.”

If you don’t see many mainstream titles on her IMDb page, it may be because studios serve up most of their features with a generous dollop of gloss. It could also be because Gerwig knows what material suits her. And she should – she’s co-written and co-directed a lot of it, mostly with independent filmmakers like Baumbach and Joe Swanberg. Though these are no doubt some of her most acclaimed performances, even in her occasional mainstream forays (2011’s Arthur and No Strings Attached) she’s often singled out as the only part of the movie worth watching. Taken as a whole, the applause seems to boil down to this: It’s very hard to catch her acting. As a performer, she is unselfconscious in a way that lets us look through her and see ourselves, and she’s not pulling any punches in the reflection.

She’s a natural if there ever was one, but for a long time the question seemed to be, a natural what? A fervent aspiring ballerina, fencer, trumpeter, aerobics instructor (that was all before graduating high school), Gerwig embraced her interests with both arms and all her passion. In college, she intended to become a playwright (or maybe study musical theater) before meeting Swanberg, who cast her in 2006’s LOL. For a while she worried about not feeling the same singular purpose or calling as some of her peers; there was also a period when she worried a move from mumblecore to mainstream might never happen. But now that hopping genres, creative capacities and even distribution platforms is becoming the industry’s new normal, it seems like a very good time to be someone who can be almost anyone – on either side of the camera.

This month, she’s in front of it in 20th Century Women along with Annette Bening and Billy Crudup. In 2017, she’ll step behind it with Lady Bird, which stars Saoirse Ronan and marks Gerwig’s first solo directing effort. She’s also working on the script for a film adaptation of Little Women – and we can’t think of a better (or more interesting) woman for the job.

For some artists, picking a lane seems not only unnecessary, but foolish, especially for an artist who’s all-in, all the time. “You could always not invest, but where’s the fun in that?” she told The Guardian earlier this year. “It’s like when people say, ‘I don’t really care about Christmas, it’s just a day.’ Of course it’s just a day, but this is all we’ve got! We go around one time… Let’s invest. It’s not always logical to do so, but what else are you gonna do with your life?”

 

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

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“A fat guy sat on my back while I was doing splits, and I was looking for my mother in the group of mothers on the sidelines…I remember sitting there, watching all of these kids do cartwheels—it just looked terrible to me. I envisioned myself getting sick, and worried about what the other kids would think, and what it would be like to not have friends for the rest of my childhood. All of those thoughts were running through my head as I searched for my mother and couldn’t find her.”

The story of Garfield’s start in gymnastics sounded more like a recurring nightmare than what it was: just another day in the life of a nervous, emotional kid, who later turned those emotions into a brilliant and original acting career. For someone who’s described himself as overly sensitive and weary of fame, acting seems an odd, if not masochistic choice of profession. Or exactly the right one. Garfield’s early troubles containing his feelings became a trademark openness and vulnerability that had him landing the kind of roles that few actors are offered so early in their careers.

Garfield made his American film debut just three years after graduating University of London’s Central School of Speech and Drama. Not in the horror flick or teen romance that typically make up the first rung of a young actor’s career ladder, but in Lions for Lambs, with Robert Redford, Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise. Well, you have to start somewhere. Garfield didn’t expect to be noticed in such company, but critics spotted a young actor they knew they’d need to keep their eyes on. And they did, even when he returned to England to make the haunting Boy A, playing a notorious killer trying to find new life after prison. It aired on BBC’s Channel 4 but was widely and glowingly reviewed across the pond. The Houston Chronicle wrote, “Whether we care depends on the actor in question, who’s forced to generate viewer sympathy while the screenplay parcels out flashbacks to his ugly criminal backstory…In Boy A, we do, and we have one man to thank for it: Andrew Garfield…His story might close with a string of ambiguities but there’s no doubt about the intelligence and sensitivity of his portrayal. It makes us feel sympathy for the devil.”

Back in the U.S., director David Fincher was starting work on The Social Network and asked him in to discuss the role of Mark Zuckerberg. The story goes he didn’t like Garfield for the part. He found Garfield’s “incredible emotional access to his kind of core humanity” better suited to Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin. If Fincher was looking for a guy who could portray the quieter half of the team whose drama was largely internal—without being wiped off the screen by Jesse Eisenberg’s peripatetic Zuckerberg—he’d found his man. Among the incoming barrage of praise and award nominations was Rolling Stone’s review: “Garfield delivered a vulnerability that raises the emotional stakes in a movie. “Keep your eyes on Garfield—he’s shatteringly good, the soul of a film that might otherwise be without one.”

With a start like that, it isn’t easy to raise the stakes. Fortunately, along came a Spider. The significance of taking on 2012’s The Amazing Spiderman went beyond the weight of helming a $750 million juggernaut. Garfield’s mom once dressed him as Spidey for a Halloween party, explaining to the four-year-old that Peter Parker was kind of a scrawny kid who stood up to bullies anyway. Garfield, who’s always felt for the oppressed and those with limited rights, saw a kindred spirit in the web-slinger. His combination of innocence, anger and droll humor breathed new life into the franchise, and audiences related. Few actors can make us see ourselves in a rubber-suited superhero. The same year, he earned raves for his Broadway debut in Death of a Salesman opposite Philip Seymour Hoffman.

With adjectives like sensitive, vulnerable and intelligent continuing to flutter around him like a sweet but persistent swarm of butterflies, you have to wonder if Garfield ever longs for a part where he can just blow stuff up. If so, it’s not looking good. As the lead in Mel Gibson’s WWII drama Hacksaw Ridge, he plays Pfc. Desmond Doss, an army medic who refuses to handle any weapon out of religious principle. In Martin Scorsese’s Silence, he plays a Portuguese Jesuit priest, ministering to Christians in 17th-century Japan. And next year, he returns to the stage as Prior Walter in Angels in America at London’s National Theatre.

For all that, Garfield has said, “I don’t deem myself successful. I put most of my happiness down to luck, and I’m enjoying it as much as I can, and being as generous as I can with it as well.” After a run like his, we’d argue there’s more than luck at play. But maybe it’s just a karmic extension of who he is. Speaking out once on marriage equality, he demanded to know, “How can anyone argue against compassion and understanding?” How, indeed.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
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You keep up on things. You know what’s going on in arts and culture. Then inevitably, it happens. Someone who wasn’t even on your radar is suddenly everywhere, making you question not where they’ve been, but where you’ve been. Meet Riz Ahmed. By now, you probably recognize him from HBO’s The Night Of, but for years, Ahmed’s been busy making wide-ranging, significant, and accomplished work.

In person, he’s not some frenetic perpetual motion machine, but he does seem to function at a brisk and constant clip, creating, provoking and questioning. He approached Naz Khan, the role that’s brought him to recent wide attention, with a simple theory: “If you see the world in a certain way, the behavior follows.” Applied to Ahmed himself, it seems an apt description of how he creates art, and with it, change.

Born in London to Pakistani immigrant parents, he won a scholarship to north London’s Merchant Taylors’ school, where he found himself and most Asian kids a subclass in a sea of diplomats’ kids in full prep regalia. He decided to do something about it, specifically, rigging a vote to force the school into electing its first Asian head boy. When other frustrations were expressed more overtly – he threw a chair intended for another student through a window – one teacher had a suggestion: “If you can muck about on stage, you get applause for it, not a suspension.” Good idea. At Oxford University, he studied philosophy, politics and economics, and also put on the only play with two non-white leads staged during his time there. When he decided to put on a drum and bass night but didn’t have immediate takers, he printed up flyers minus the venue and kept at it until he found a club willing to fill in the blank. College confirmed something he’d sensed all along: You can make yourself an insider, but the world will send you occasional reminders that status is temporary. It’s a perspective that’s informed his work across genres, including film, TV, stage and music.

He did manage to work in some drama studies, and made his film debut at 23 playing a member of the real-life Tipton Three in Michael Winterbottom’s The Road to Guantánamo. He also made a three-hour debut at the Luton Airport, where he and another actor from the film were detained under the Terrorism Act by Special Branch upon returning from the Berlin Film Festival. We’re sure the Branch boys were just exercising caution; we’re also pretty sure that wouldn’t have happened to Matt and Ben.

Ahmed was nominated for his first British Independent Film Award for Shifty, and highly praised for his effortless, persuasive chemistry with other actors. His second came for Four Lions, Chris Morris’ hilarious satire on terrorism. Mira Nair, who directed him in The Reluctant Fundamentalist, recognized his unique ability to play characters that shift between worlds. “It’s the most demanding, complicated role for a young person to carry a film on his shoulders, and to be somebody at once absolutely authentic to the Lahori universe, yet absolutely comfortable, elegant and savvy in the Wall Street universe; to spout the poetry of Faiz at one moment and ruthlessly cut out a factory in Manila the next.”

Eventually American filmmakers saw his work (or at least got hold of reviews routinely peppered with words like “charismatic” “brilliant” and “natural”) and wanted in. His performance opposite Jake Gyllenhal in Nightcrawler was outstanding, and in its review of Jason Bourne, RogerEbert.com wrote, “Only Riz Ahmed makes any impact on a performance level, doing a lot with very little – watch the way he subtly plays a successful businessman who knows the skeletons are about to fall out of his closet. There’s a much better version of Jason Bourne that focuses on him…” This year’s been a big one for him. He’s in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, and puts a new spin on the gumshoe genre in City of Tiny Lights. He’s also working on a multi-generational Pakistani-British family story he aims to make for U.K. television.

If the industry (ironically) helped Ahmed’s early career with its tendency to see in stereotypes, it’s also allowed us glimpses of a depth we’d otherwise miss by occasionally looking past them. Needless to say, that goes for society as a whole, and Ahmed is not shy about voicing that opinion. But he knows that if you’re going to be an unapologetic button-pusher, you best avoid righteous self-aggrandizement and do it with some humor. And some serious rap. Under the handle Riz MC, he’s put out three albums of songs that have been critically acclaimed (and in one instance, banned) for their biting – and bitingly funny – take on immigration, race and other issues.

Ahmed specializes in playing, and being, an insider-outsider. If you’ve never felt like an outsider, don’t count yourself lucky; it’s a perspective that benefits us. Which is why we need this guy to keep acting, rapping, writing, and if necessary, throwing the occasional chair.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

If you’re an actor who’s signed on to share scenes with Michael Shannon, you’ve got yourself a bit of a dilemma. On one hand, you can count on people watching; on the other, you can be pretty certain they won’t be watching you. To be fair, nothing could be further from Shannon’s intent; co-stars and directors routinely praise his generosity and dedication to the success of any project he’s in. It’s just that the guy is – inherently, chronically and helplessly – riveting.

Evidence of this seemingly hypnotic power came to light most publicly with his fairly small role in Revolutionary Road. Variety wrote, “The pic’s startling supporting turn comes from Michael Shannon, who’s mesmerizing as the clinically insane son of local realtor and busybody… When Shannon is onscreen, it’s impossible to watch anyone else.” In that instance, “anyone else” included Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. Or take 99 Homes, which Time magazine called “a showcase for Shannon, who magnetizes all eyes, like a cobra in the corner.”

Those are just two in a canon of some of the most consistently beaming reviews an actor could ever hope to paste in his scrapbook, though Shannon doesn’t seem like the kind of guy to keep one. If he did, it would be encyclopedic, as he’s piled up over 50 award nominations and an impressive number of wins over a career that comprises at least 100 film, TV and stage credits. So why is he not a household name? Hard to say, unless actors have to become “stars” to claim any permanency in our memory banks.

What’s more confounding is that Shannon never planned to be an actor. He was a troubled, late-blooming kid who floundered in school and only defaulted to drama to get out of sports. He left school at 16 and with no formal training, was on stage in a year, TV the year after, and in Groundhog Day the year after that. Shannon tried working with an acting coach only once in his career, and said it was the worst audition he ever had.

With fate apparently having done the heavy lifting, an impressive range of directors were quick to capitalize, including Michael Bay, Cameron Crowe, Oliver Stone, Peter Bogdanovich, Sydney Lumet, and even Tom Ford. As did HBO, casting him as Boardwalk Empire’s repressed G-man Nelson Van Alden. But no one has taken better advantage of Shannon’s facile embodiment of complex characters than Jeff Nichols, who directed him in Take Shelter, Midnight Special, and Shotgun Stories. Nichols has said, “Shannon makes me a better writer. He certainly makes me a better director. I wanted [Midnight Special] to be a very lean screenplay in terms of narrative and exposition, and if you’re writing that part for Mike, he’s going to be able to fill those spaces with all the subtext that you don’t want to have to write about. He can carry all of that on his face, and that makes him a very powerful tool for a writer/director like me.”

What more directors need to take advantage of is Shannon’s range, which seems to be hiding in plain sight. He’s known for playing menacing, angry, possibly crazy guys whose ability to keep it all just beneath the surface keeps us in their thrall – quiet bears you do not want to poke. While he plays them subtly and brilliantly, he also made a surprisingly good low-key romantic lead in Frank & Lola. His comic chops are most evident on the stage, where he still spends as much time as possible. Look no further than his portrayal of showbiz huckster Felix Artifex in the comedy Mistakes Were Made, a role he’s reprised several times to wildly enthusiastic crowds and ticket sales. The New York Times theater critic Charles Isherwood said Shannon shouldered the part “with a full arsenal of gifts: a subdued but strong natural presence, a voice rich in grit and capable of imbuing Felix’s wheedling and needling with a variety of emotional colors, a keen understanding of how pathos can feed comedy and vice versa.” Roger Ebert put it more succinctly: “His performance in Mistakes Were Made was one of the most amazing I have ever seen.” Given that it’s a one-man play, it may also be the only performance in which Shannon risked being upstaged.

For all the taut wiring that sparks below his surface, Shannon says he’s learned to relax a bit more these days, and that approach has made him a better actor. Besides begging the question whether it’s possible for him to be any better, it also demonstrates a broad interpretation of the word “relax”. He already has eight projects in the works for next year, including Horse Soldiers, a Special Forces drama with Chris Hemsworth, and Signature Move, which he’s executive producing. He admits he may have a small problem turning down a great script. All the better for us. Maybe Shannon wasn’t looking to become an actor, but sometimes fate just gets things right.

This is the best way to experience Off Camera- When you get the app, you can instantly subscribe to Off Camera, or buy single issues a la carte. The Off Camera app is a beautifully designed hybrid magazine with the entire television version of Off Camera contained within it, available for any tablet or mobile device.

This e-magazine has all the images and extra content available in the physical version of the Off Camera magazine, plus enhanced HD video streaming so you can enjoy Off Camera your way.

After downloading the app, you will find Off Camera in your Apple newsstand folder. You can play steaming HD video straight from the pages of the app, making this experience truly multi-media.

Off Camera subscriptions available:
Single Issue/episode: (non-subscription): $2.99
6 month subscription: (11 issues/episodes): $27.99
1 year subscription: (22 issues/episodes): $49.99

Available in the Apple App Store and on Amazon:

A bit of geek trivia: Halt and Catch Fire (HCF) was an early computer command that caused the machine to run as fast as possible. The AMC show of the same name has had similar effect on Mackenzie Davis, accelerating her career and causing the actress to catch fire (the good kind) herself. Despite the fine early indie film work that constitutes her still-young career, playing the volatile personal computing prodigy Cameron Howe on Halt and Catch Fire brought her to wide attention in 2014. It widened further when the network made the critically praised season-two decision to focus on the relationship of its female protagonists.

Another bit of trivia (or is it irony?):  Davis actually became aware of the role while helping a now-former boyfriend run lines for his audition for the show. But what’s really fascinating about Halt is that it takes place in the 1980s, foreshadowing startup mania as well as the plight of smart women dealing with sexism and finding their voice in the tech world. It lets us go back in time and watch Silicon Valley evolve – and in many respects, sadly, stay the same. What’s also interesting is how Davis’ role echoes her own spirit, ambition and experience in the industry.

Acting was always Davis’ plan, and she was eager to leave Vancouver, BC and get going. Her parents insisted on an education first, a demand she says she doesn’t regret, as her degrees in English Lit and gender studies lend valuable perspective – and a distinct point of view – to her work. She started out in modeling but found she hated it, in no small part for the expectation to be pretty all the time. She started booking some stage work, and while acting at NYC’s Neighborhood Playhouse, she was discovered by Drake Doremus, who cast her in her first feature, Breathe In.

As she began getting parts in indies and shorts, she ran into the dilemma facing most young actresses in Hollywood: the roles you need to take to build your career often still play to gender stereotypes. She’s confronted her fair share of “surprise” nude scenes that somehow weren’t included in the scripts she auditioned with.  But she’s managed to stretch those tropes, even in films that put her on the edge of them. The Hollywood Reporter gave her props for holding her own against “movie-girlfriend default settings” in That Awkward Moment. Other movies, like this year’s brilliantly entertaining Always Shine allow her to comment on them while ostensibly acting in a thriller. Davis and Caitlin FitzGerald play two friends, both actresses, finding differing degrees of success. One is resigned to roles that reflect the industry’s narrow definition of femininity; the other refuses any part that smells of simpering or victimhood. (Guess who’s more successful, and which role is Davis’.) IndieWire said, “Davis and FitzGerald communicate each emotion perfectly. Between the genre and the size of the film, these are the types of roles that don’t generally get recognized during awards season, but they’ll likely be among the year’s best performances.”

Still other movies have Davis playing directly against female stereotype. Los Angeles Times praised The Martian’s adroit casting of Davis in one of its many nerdy roles, an eagle-eyed satellite image viewer. In describing the roles she seeks, Davis has said, “I want to play active people who can solve problems, not people who have things thrust in their lap and need somebody to solve their problems for them.” Though the part was a small one, it wound up fulfilling her biggest acting dream since…ever. The Martian director Ridley Scott also helmed Blade Runner, Davis’ favorite movie of all time. When she heard he was planning a sequel, well… Of course she’d have to kill you if she told you anything about Blade Runner 2049, but suffice it to say she’s in it.

The ever-restless Davis doesn’t like not working, which we doubt is something she’ll have to worry about anytime soon (though she was a terrific waitress, if you’re not too picky about health codes). In addition to Blade Runner 2049, she’s wrapped the haunting, still-to-be-released Memory Box and is filming 2017’s Tully with Charlize Theron. All while not halting Halt.

 We’re watching Halt and Catch Fire because it’s a story very much still being written.  We’re watching Davis because hers is, too – and just as intriguing.

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